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#51647
Scuba Tank Types and Sizes
Greg - 2/02/2013 10:20 AM
Category: Equipment
Replies: 18

Can you please help me list the common scuba tank types (ie: al, steel, carbon fiber, etc.) and sizes (ie: 80 cubic feet)? I do not dive with carbon fiber or doubles, so if you do, I especially need your help in listing the most common types/sizes. Here is what I have so far:


AL - 50cf/7L

AL - 63cf/9L

AL - 80cf/11L

AL - 100cf/13L

Steel - 80cf/11L

Steel - 100cf/13L

Steel - 120cf/15L

Twin AL - 80cf/11L

Twin Steel 100cf/13L
#10168
Eric_R - 2/02/2013 12:38 PM
Here’s a bunch.
Tanks a lot.
#28713
RAWalker - 2/02/2013 6:31 PM
In steel you have low, high and intermediate pressure tanks.

For low pressure I know 77, 80, 95, 108 and 120cf are common 77 being older tanks that are still common in use. The rest are common modern sizes low pressure are 2400 psi and with a plus "+" rating gain another 10% pressure capacity (2640 psi) which is the pressure they make their volumes at.

High pressure tanks are 3500 and some special tanks even higher. I know these to be available in 80, 100, 120 and 130 cf

All of these both LP & HP can and have been configured for Doubles. LP are commonly also used at over their rated pressures which allows a diver to stuff in extra volume for extended bottom times. This is common among cave divers that feel the need for the extra volume in a smaller tank to squeeze through tight spaces.

I does however pose a risk of tank failure and explosion. These tanks even when not exploded will be capable of far fewer fill cycles and will experience early hydro failure.
#1600
lerpy - 2/02/2013 7:38 PM
The tank I dive with is a Steel 150cf. If not using that then a Steel 130cf. I have a set of Steel LP95 that my buddy uses as singles, or I will double them up when wanting doubles.
#51647
Subscribed
Greg - 2/02/2013 9:26 PM
Thanks everyone. I’m mainly looking for the type and volume. Those are the primary factors in determining buoyancy. Also, I’m mainly interested in the most common used. Not a list of all possible tanks.
#51647
Subscribed
Greg - 2/02/2013 9:27 PM
Anyone have knowledge or experience with carbon fiber tanks?
#7355
UWnewbee - 2/03/2013 7:41 AM
have used only the SCBA 4500 PSI
#3083
RichKeller - 2/03/2013 10:34 AM
The only carbon fiber tanks I am aware of are from Divator.


http://www.interspiro.com/index-usa.htm
#1806
hcdiveteambrian - 2/03/2013 11:23 AM
From Progrower: Here’s a bunch. Tanks a lot....


I have one to add to this list:

Heisler 106cf 2900+10% psi (3190psi is supposed to be 106cf, it weighs 74lbs filled.) It’d be really good for a big dry suit diver, I weigh 150-160lbs and use a single 7mm body glove wetsuit with it. It’s good on deep dives. The 15 yr old Tusa Imprex BC gets a work out on the surface and the bottom.
#1806
hcdiveteambrian - 2/03/2013 11:31 AM
From hcdiveteambrian: I have one to add to this list: Heisler 106cf 2900+10% psi (3190psi is supposed to be 106cf, it weighs 74lbs filled.) It’d be really good for a big dry suit diver, I weigh 150-160lbs and use a single 7mm body glove wetsuit with it. It’s good on deep dives. The 15 yr old Tusa Imprex BC gets a work out on the surface and the bottom. [/p...


Not the most common tank. I know of 1 other dive with one.
#1806
hcdiveteambrian - 2/03/2013 11:31 AM
From hcdiveteambrian: Not the most common tank. I know of 1 other dive with one. [/p...
1 other "diver" with one!
#2549
jreitz1 - 2/04/2013 9:59 AM
I dive with 2 Steel tanks. An LP90 and a PST119.

They are the same size at 24" long by 8" diam. The only difference is that the LP is 2400 and the PST is a 3442.
#17890
LatitudeAdjustment - 2/04/2013 1:13 PM
I’m using 80AL’s which you list, Faber 72’s, a 19AL stage bottle and a LP 14AL pony which I understand were originally fire extinguisher bottles. They are 2050psi and liveaboards are forever topping it off to 3000psi without asking, at that pressure they ring when tapped!
#5471
DiveBuddyChgo - 3/15/2013 9:35 PM
I use OMS steel low pressure 85’s. The tanks have 85 cu. ft. when filled to 2450 psi. You get a better fill because the tanks don’t get so hot. Also when filled to 3200psi the tank now has just over 100 cu. ft and your not charged for a HP fill. The tank bouancy also doesn’t change at all from filled to 500 psi. In Europe these same tanks are rated as high pressure. The DOT only allows a 2450 psi in the US. Great way to get 103 cu. ft. for a LP fill cost and also easier on the dive shop to top off.
#1541
ScubaDreaminn - 3/18/2013 7:19 AM
Although this site does not list CF tanks as it is in it’s infancy stage (for Scuba), it has just about every tank imaginable listed along with the tanks physical sizes and buoyancy characteristics with the tank full and empty while underwater. Very useful info for those that are working on Buoyancy/Trim or converting over to a BP/W, Doubles or Side Mount setup...:)
http://www.huronscuba.com/equipment/scubaCylinderSpecification.html