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#622
Learning to sail.
Matt65 - 10/01/2009 10:24 PM
Category: Training
Replies: 4

 Ok, so I might get chastized for posting this here on dive buddy, it’s about learning to sail rather than diving, but the two could be closely related right? Anyway, can anyone tell me if it is (Typically) hard to learn how to sail a sail boat? I understand that all people are different, and some learn faster than others. But I was wondering if generally speaking if learning to sail is a dificult long drawn out process? Like would it be compareable to say getting a pilots license? Is there alot af schooling involved? I consider myself to be an intelligent individual, quick to learn most things that I want to learn. I will be moving to North Carolina in the not to distant future, and I welcome anyone’s input on the subject. Thanks for taking the time to read my forum posting, take care, and dive safe!
#15486
LatitudeAdjustment - 10/02/2009 7:01 AM


Matt there are sailing schools that will teach you and I’m sure you can find one in NC, maybe even in NV. You will need at least an ASA101 course to rent a larger boat but the best way to learn the basics is in a small dingy. They are not as forgiving and anything you do wrong will be apparent right away :)


Look into yacht clubs, most have sailing lessons, boat rentals and best of all you can get hands on training crewing on someone else’s boat or share the rental.


The first thing you will learn is you can’t sail into the wind so don’t launch your dingy when the wind is at your back just like don’t jump off the boat and dive down current, both will end with the ride of shame back to your starting point.


And for off season sailing you already have the wetsuit!
#1574
drifter12 - 10/02/2009 8:47 AM
Hi Matt: I am a sailor, (and a pilot) Sailing is not difficult but does take some skill to handle the boat, know the wind, learn the rigging, knots etc, and you must learn navigation and weather patterns. There are many "how to" books available, that is a good place to start. I sail mostly on lake Michigan but lost my boat a few years back. (Got knocked down in a storm 20miles out and sank) I am searching for a replacement now. Sailing is a great adventure and it does not eat you alive in gas and insurance. The U.S. Power Squadron has a good 6-8 week class which includes navigation, weather, waterway rules, etc . Good luck and I would be glad to answer any questions you come up with. Ted J>
#2248
SKEETER - 10/03/2009 7:15 AM


Sailing is fun and so is diving. If you are going to dive from a sail boat. One must make sure that you can get back on saftly and that the boat can stay with you. Here is West Palm Beach, Fl. the current can be fast and the boat must stay with th divers. So Have a good time sailing and keep diving, We do.


But diving off a open deck is so much saser.
#60
Karen - 10/06/2009 2:16 PM


Dear Matt, There is a Captain out of Miami that is a fabulous instructor. There is a lot to learn, but not as dangerous as flying. At least you can swim, I assume. Check out her webpage at http://bikinisailing.com/index.html Her name is Captain Jennifer Worth. Also there is the book, Sailing Fundamentals by Gary Jobson and there are a couple of good books from the United States Power Squadron. It is a great sport. Enjoy!