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From AlertDiver.com; into Munro Bight to dive the wreck of the SS Nord. One of Tassie’s signature dives, this 290-foot cargo steamship sank in 1915 during a brutal storm. We’re smack dab in the middle of the "roaring forties," where gale-force westerly winds and punishing waves have a long history of wreaking havoc on vessels plying these extreme southern latitudes. But today’s June weather is lovely — 60°F under the bluest of skies with just a gentle breeze — and my wife, Melissa, and I thoroughly enjoy surveying this sleeping giant from a past age. It rests upright on a sandy bottom at 130 feet. Our 28 percent nitrox is put to good use, extending our bottom time at the stern. The Nord’s enormous rudder and propeller are the prime photo attractions, glowing a soft yellowy orange in the blue-green gloom thanks to a patina of encrusting zoanthid anemones and sponges.





More info; australia.greatestdivesites.com/tasmania/ss_nord_wreck

YouTube, youtube.com/watch?v=_a6Vc41cMag
Diving the wreck of the SS Nord, off the Tasman Peninsula, Tasmania, Australia. Built in 1900, the SS Nord sank in 1915 in Munroe Bight after striking the uncharted Needle Rock between Cheverton and Hippolyte Rocks, and now lies in 40m of water. The SS Nord was 270 ft (83m) in length, 1057 tonnes, with a single screw powered by a triple expansion twin boiler engine of 240HP. She was carrying 12,000 cases of benzine (motor spirit) when she sank. All hands survived.
Filmed by Mick Baron

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