Join DiveBuddy.com

Meet new scuba divers, maintain a virtual dive log, participate in our forum, share underwater photos, research dive sites and more. Members login here.

Upload Photo


Loading...
450-foot grain freighter was built by Chapman & Wilan in 1911 in Stockton on Tees, Darlington, England. The freighter was first used as a Royal Naval Collier and then chartered for wheat cargoes from the US, Canada and Australia. It struck DRY ROCKS by Saba Island when it was coming from Vancouver to Hamburg. It was initially refloated and taken in tow but it floundered shortly after just off St. Thomas on the 31st of May 1928. After the war, the Navy used it for deep diving training. It now sits on the ocean bottom at about 110 feet and is sure to impress! As you start to descend, you will start to realize just how big 6,341 tons can be. With the bow being scrunchedup from point of impact, you will be taken aback by the sheer number of fish swimming around in the Grainton’s once-intact bowels. Make your way back to the expansive midsection cutouts and see what is has to offer. The numerous swim-throughs allow you to explore the spacious compartments and you can feel the ship’s solitude. Or experience the sea life, such as a giant sea turtle swimming about or a barracuda whipping around chasing after its next meal or the collapsed bulk heads providing shelter for all sorts of local critters. You are sure to be overwhelmed with the wonders of the sea that you are taking in. When you start to explore the scattered stern section, be on the lookout as we are never sure what will be hanging around! With the Grainton being an example of a thriving eco-system in its prime, all 450’ can better be known as a wreck lover’s dream…….

Dive Site Map

Map Legend