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#1787
California Diver Missing Presumed Dead
NVR2L8 - 9/20/2008 11:34 AM
Category: Health & Safety
Replies: 2



LAGUNA BEACH, California (15 Sep 2008) — A diver who disappeared off Treasure Island on September 11 is still missing and presumed dead.


Authorities said John S. Park, 29, disappeared while free-diving and spearfishing with two friends.


The two other divers told rescue officials they returned to shore but Park never made it.


After searching for about an hour, they called for help and a massive air and sea search was launched.


Assisting in the search were Laguna Beach firefighters and lifeguards, the U.S. Coast Guard, Harbor Patrol, a Newport Beach police helicopter and U.S. Ocean Safety lifeguards.


Sgt. Jason Kravetz of the Laguna Beach Police Department said the search was officially called off on Friday.


 












#622
Matt65 - 9/20/2008 9:47 PM
Forgive me for sounding unsympathetic, and perhaps I misunderstood things, but why did they wait am hour before calling for help?
#1787
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NVR2L8 - 9/21/2008 12:25 AM
I’m not sure why his friends ended up on the shore without their buddy. The missing diver was free diving, so he could not have stayed underwater for more than a minute at a time. They probably lost track of time and when they realized he hadn’t returned to shore, they panicked and then called 911. This is the second fatal diving accident in California during September. In the other fatal accident in Northern California, the scuba diver was experienced (retired Coast Guard Rescue Diver) who drown in 12 feet of water after becoming entangled in kelp. There were two other divers with him who were unable to rescue him. California has averaged one fatal diving accident a month this year. Sadly, most of them probably could have been prevented if the divers had followed standard safety protocols which are taught in beginning scuba classes. Hopefully we can learn some valuable lessons from these tragic accidents.