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#51617
Would you own/drive a car that runs on compressed air?
Greg - 8/23/2012 10:08 AM
Category: General
Replies: 7

AirPod, is a car that runs on compressed air:








Capable of a top speed of 43 mph and powered by MDI’s 4 kw (5.45 hp) compressed air motor, the 3-4 passenger three-wheeler will have a range of upwards of 130+ miles when traveling at 15-20 miles per hour on the equivalent of less than $1 worth of electricity.

The composite plastic body car measures a mere 82 inches in length, 63 inches wide and 79 inches high. There are two versions: a passenger model weighting 485 lbs and a cargo version at 462 lbs. The cargo version has a storage capacity of 39 cubic feet.

Entrance and egress from the vehicle happens through the front and rear. The driver sits facing forward while any passengers will sit facing the rear. According to Shiva Vencat, MDI’s representative for the Americas, three smaller adults can sit abreast in the rear, or more comfortably two adults and child.

Steering is accomplished with a "guide-by-wire" joystick mounted on the right. The turning radius of the vehicle is 75 inches. The two front wheels are small and close-set under the vehicle.

The 46-gallon carbon fiber compressed air tank can be pressurized in under two minutes at up to 4,500 psi using a commercial compressor.

Home refilling would be accomplished using a small air compressor, and not using the car’s air motor as previously reported. Refilling would take an estimated three hours and if it’s like most home shop-type compressors, it would be noisy; a clear advantage for batteries, which recharge silently.

While the jury is still out as to the relative energy efficiency of using compressed air as an energy storage medium when compared to electric car batteries, the AirPod does have one critical advantage: its compressed air tank should last longer and cost less than chemical batteries.

Perhaps most promising of all is the anticipated price: $7,000 US.
#28698
RAWalker - 8/23/2012 2:51 PM
Wow another good use for my breathing air compressor. Can I use the car’s air tank as part of my cascade system?
#51617
Subscribed
Greg - 8/23/2012 2:55 PM
Or just make the whole vehicle submersible and attach some regs to the tank.
#17183
LatitudeAdjustment - 8/23/2012 5:27 PM
That just wouldn’t work on my commute, at least with my bike which is faster BTW, I can ride on the shoulder out of traffic most of the time.

I’ve always thought a DPV powered by an air motor would be viable, have the air coming out of the motor 150psi so your second stage could use it :)
#7914
Rich-D-Fish - 8/24/2012 6:52 AM
James Bond eat your heart out! Biggest problem this design has is its curb weight. One big gust of wind puts you in another lane.
#17183
LatitudeAdjustment - 8/24/2012 8:14 AM
From Rich-D-Fish: James Bond eat your heart out! Biggest problem this design has is its curb weight. One big gust of wind puts you in another lane. ...
If the big gust comes from the rear it could double your speed :)
#51617
Subscribed
Greg - 8/24/2012 3:33 PM
From LatitudeAdjustment: If the big gust comes from the rear it could double your speed :...
Putting a hatch in the floor to run with your feet would also double the speed.
#543
mikey1077 - 8/26/2012 6:01 AM
wouldnt want to get rear ended in that thing that would make for a real bad day Ill stick with my gas guzziling truck for now