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#606
Nautilus Lifeline GPS Radio for Divers
diverdown53 - 12/08/2010 11:15 AM
Category: Equipment
Replies: 17




kirkscubager is proud to be a distributor of the Nautilus Lifeline, the newest GPS for divers.
Always connected, and never left behind.
You wouldn’t dive without fins or a mask, don’t dive without a Nautilus Lifeline.
Distress Button, Waterproof to 425 feet, Strobe Light, Boat Button, Speaker and Microphone, Antenna, GPS, LCD Display, Chat Button, USB port, 24 hours of battery in distress mode, easily attaches to D ring.
Coming March 2011
Enjoy the Video!!!








#17762
LatitudeAdjustment - 12/08/2010 12:08 PM


Looks neat but what do you mean by "You wouldn’t dive without fins or a mask" You haven’t tried that or left your weight belt on the boat!? Actually I haven’t forgotten the mask but tried to put it on while still wearing sunglasses :)


That radio would be a good add in for my sailboat too.
#606
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diverdown53 - 12/08/2010 12:17 PM
Lol at the comment about the mask and sunglasses-good one!!!! Kathy
#51644
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Greg - 12/10/2010 6:00 PM
Can you write more on how this device works?
#228
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Waterskier1 - 12/12/2010 2:51 PM
I question the legality (in the USA anyway) of this. Specifically the "chat" feature, which appears to be transmitting on VHF Marine channels. VHF marine radios require a ship station license, unless operated from voluntary ships operating domestically. A ships license is granted to the ship, not the person. There are unique situations where a portable can be used in conjunction with it’s ship’s radio, but never by an independent (from the ship’s license) person. The only other exception to the requirement for a ships license is for use on land, which requires a marine utility station license. One must show a need to communicate with ships while walking (portable) on land. There are also fixed land radio station licenses, for fixed land operation.

Then, you would most likely also need a Radio Operators Permit to operate that radio, unless it was on a voluntary ship operating domestically. Note that domestically forbids communications outside the USA, including traveling to foreign ports.

If operated outside the USA, one would need to secure a station license and operator permit IAW the specific regulatory agency of that country.

Use even in an emergency is a violation. Each of us would have to weigh violating the law versus the potential risk of safety by not doing so. I personally know of hikers whose lives’ were saved by illegally transmitting on VHF marine frequencies, and were cited for the illegal operation by the FCC.
#17762
LatitudeAdjustment - 12/13/2010 9:26 AM


From Waterskier1: Use even in an emergency is a violation. Each of us would have to weigh violating the law versus the potential risk of safety by not doing so. I personally know of hikers whose lives’ were saved by illegally transmitting on VHF marine frequencies, and were cited for the illegal operation by the FCC.



Better to argue this in court yourself with the FCC than have your heirs argue over your will :)
#228
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Waterskier1 - 12/13/2010 1:46 PM
From LatitudeAdjustment:

Better to argue this in court yourself with the FCC than have your heirs argue over your will :)

Each person will have to make their own decision - but they should know that the use is illegal in the USA, and likely most places worldwide, which the OP neglects to mention.

Also, taking your chances in a USA court is considerably different than a foreign country’s court system, which may not afford the same rights many of us in the USA take for granted. The fine in the USA may well be worth the cost of a life, but possible imprisonment in other countries should be carefully weighed against other potential (and legal) methods of not getting lost in the first place, and increasing the chances of being found if you are lost.

Bottom Line: You may want to do some research before you automatically assume that this will be legal to use throughout the world.
#606
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diverdown53 - 12/13/2010 5:20 PM
Thanks to both of you for posting this-I am not familiar with marine radio in the US. I appreciate you bringing this to light.

Kathy
#5919
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SCUBASMITTY - 12/14/2010 10:06 PM
I dive deeper then 10ft WAY deeper,-so if it is only rated to ten/ why would I need it AFTER a good long deep dive,and no one is around ??my mask might NOT be on CORRECTLY for the diver in distress- but I damn sure will be flailing my arm’s and screaming my lung’s out trying to get EVERYONE’S attention SUN OR NOT !- at this price- I will use my whistle/safety sausage and moon mirror before I purchase something as frivolent... !!
#17762
LatitudeAdjustment - 12/15/2010 3:17 PM


From MarkA: This device is no replacement for a properly registered EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon) which will really bring the cavalry and save your but when needed.



An EPIRB does not notify the boat you are lost from, it sends a signal up to a satalite that beams it to a ground station that calls your home, you did send in the product registration didn’t you? And is anybody home to verify you should be near the gps position they are getting a signal from before notifying the cavalry? IF you are diving off some third world country that doesn’t have a cavalry you are SOL! If you are in the US you will still be bobbing in the ocean hours before they rule out some kid triggered the EPIRB and send the USCG looking for you.


 A pair of kayakers got blown away from Utila, the Honduran Armada wasn’t interested in doing a search so the kayak rental agency hired a local pilot to find his kayaks, he didn’t. An illegal radio or one of these in the drybag would have been nice. In Eucador I was told help was a day or two away.


Smitty, 10’ with the cap open, 400’ with it stowed.
#606
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diverdown53 - 12/15/2010 5:48 PM
Thanks for all your feedback-appreciate it!!!

Kathy
#5427
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flaski - 12/19/2010 9:14 AM
I am confident i would choose a dive op that would not leave me. I have been seeing several devices similar to this in the past 6 months popping up. What i am wanting to see are some better devices for Location and tagging such as open water tagging devices not types for cave diving. Mainly type used that a transmittier is added to anchor line and t wrist device that has a direction indicator.
#25
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nautiluslifeline - 1/05/2011 3:35 PM


Hi there,

Margaret here from the Nautilus Lifeline.

The Nautilus Lifeline will be certified as a VHF radio by FCC and CE and certified for use in most countries around the world.

No base station radio license is required in the US.
No operator license is required in the US.
This information is found directly on the FCC website http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=licensing&id=ship_stations.


In 19 years of running liveaboard dive trips in B.C., Alaska and offshore Mexico, we have always been able to recover all our divers (although some have drifted off-site and then been found). Our concern - and the reason we invented this device - is to add one more plank to our safety platform for even better odds. The inventor, Captain Mike Lever of the Nautilus Explorer, welcomes and is seeking all comments and ideas on this. Please contact him at mike@nautilusexplorer.com.



Thank you!

#25
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nautiluslifeline - 1/05/2011 3:39 PM


Here is a working version of that link


http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=licensing&id=ship_stations



Thanks!
#606
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diverdown53 - 1/06/2011 6:03 PM
Thanks for bringing everyone up to speed Margaret!!

Kathy

www.kirkscubagear.com
#228
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Waterskier1 - 8/10/2011 2:57 PM
From nautiluslifeline:

Hi there,

Margaret here from the Nautilus Lifeline.

The Nautilus Lifeline will be certified as a VHF radio by FCC and CE and certified for use in most countries around the world.

No base station radio license is required in the US.
No operator license is required in the US.
This information is found directly on the FCC website http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=licensing&id=ship_stations.

In 19 years of running liveaboard dive trips in B.C., Alaska and offshore Mexico, we have always been able to recover all our divers (although some have drifted off-site and then been found). Our concern - and the reason we invented this device - is to add one more plank to our safety platform for even better odds. The inventor, Captain Mike Lever of the Nautilus Explorer, welcomes and is seeking all comments and ideas on this. Please contact him at mike@nautilusexplorer.com.


Thank you!


That link clearly states the only exception to requiring is license is "aboard voluntary ships operating domestically."

It then defines "The term "voluntary ships" refers to ships that are not required by law to carry a radio. Generally, this term applies to recreation or pleasure craft. The term "voluntary ships" does not apply to the following:
...
2. Ships certified by the U.S. Coast Guard to carry more than 6 passengers for hire in the open sea or tidewaters of the U.S."

I think most all dive op’s vessels would fall under this classification. Sure, if you’re diving off you own personal pleasure craft, or one of your friends’, you don’t need a license to operate on-board that craft. It is not clear that you can operate the radio off-board the craft though. I know you can use it on land.

But, the main point is, a vessel required to have a VHF Radio (such as a commercial boat certified to carry more than 6 passengers for hire) does require a license.

Also, the last time I checked with Nautilus, they had not applied for or received FCC-type certification. This is required of all radios operated in the VHF-Marine band (whether they are required to have a station license or not). They promised to get back to me when they received certification, but they have not, to date, so I must presume they have not received this certification.

I’m not picking on Nautilus. This is a great sounding product. It just appears that Nautilus hasn’t acknowledged all the steps need to market and use this in the USA, much less in foreign ports. And they don’t tell you of this potential legal omission. Once the liability of illegal operation is recognized, each person can then make an informed decision as to whether they will to break the law or not. It is kind of like not knowing it is illegal to carry a weapon somewhere... and purchasing one for self defense, even though it is illegal. On must make their own informed decision, as to the risks and mitigation they are willing to takes for themselves. Knowing the facts are part of the risk analysis.