Join DiveBuddy.com

Meet new scuba divers, maintain a virtual dive log, participate in our forum, share underwater photos, research dive sites and more. Members login here.

#559
Sorry, Padi. Close but no cigar.
BenDavid - 5/04/2017 6:50 PM
Category: Training
Replies: 8

I take exception to this question on the Rescue Diver exam....

"The most common cause of lung over expansion injury is~"
A.Forgetting to never hold the breath
B. running out of air
C. runaway low pressure inflator
D. none of the above.

Running out of air DOES NOT "cause" a lung over expansion injury, PADI. NOT BREATHING does. I’ve run out of air a gazillion times at Radio Island. I do it on purpose. I know that at 30 feet, I can just swim to the surface while exhaling. I’ve done it for 17 years. As in, Tank so empty when you turn on the valve, nothing comes out. So empty when you inhale on the reg theres nothing there.

Now I get what they are trying to say, that...."Most people hold their breath when they run out of air", and that causes LOE injury, but it isn’t the no-air-in-the-tank that CAUSES the injury. If it was, I could just go out in the garage and hook up my reg and breath the tank all the way empty, and then fall over on the garage cement floor with a LOE injury.

This question/answer needs to be changed "A" is the CORRECT answer. "B" is the answer PADI wants to hear so you don’t sue them when you run out of air and claim they told you in class it was OK.

Under PADI’s logic, if I bought a lottery ticket at the corner store and walked out into traffic and got hit by a car while scratching it off to see if I won, the CAUSE of my accident was there’s a convenient store on the corner.
#13056
LatitudeAdjustment - 5/05/2017 7:34 AM
Back in the days of J-valves running out of air happened a lot. :( Bumping the J-valve down on the down line or wreck made for an exciting dive and nobody I knew got "over expansion injury" :)
It’s amazing coming up from 90’ how much air keeps bubbling out of your mouth! After that you become anal checking the rod to make sure the valve is in the correct position all during the dive :)
#6010
Eric_R - 5/06/2017 8:41 PM
With the same logic a is also incorrect. Forgetting to never hold your breath? So If I hold my breath under water I will get a LOE? It’s holding your breath while ascending where it can occur. Why do these agencies put questions with multiple answers that technically aren’t correct? They should use answers that will teach good practices.
#559
Subscribed
BenDavid - 5/09/2017 6:24 PM
B is the answer PADI wanted, so B is the answer PADI got. Next time I go to the shop with an empty tank after I dive I’m going to run into the fill station with my tank screaming "I’M OUT OF AIR! I’M OUT OF AIR. QUICK, FILL UP MY TANK BEFORE I GET A LOE!!!"

This is the same category with this "mask on forehead is a sign of distress" crap PADI is pushing now. What distresses me more than seeing a diver with his mask on his forehead is an instructor or experienced diver that’s too frigging ignorant to tell the difference between a guy with his mask on his forehead and a guy panicking and drowning.

I get why PADI does it though. It’s the "If we remove all the thinking out of the equation, even the stupid ones can dive and pay us money" concept.
#172
Subscribed
UnderwaterMartini - 5/10/2017 4:51 PM
That sure is a garbage question. The best answer is clearly A. Even though I get it, most of the people squirting blood out of their ears and nose at the surface ran out of air and held their breath.

Also, people panicking and about to drown, usually are nearly silent, and hardly splash at all. A good life guard can spot it, the average diver? Forget about it. It’s rare to hear "help".
#63
Subscribed
Colliam7 - 5/19/2017 11:05 AM
I take exception to this question on the Rescue Diver exam....

"The most common cause of lung over expansion injury is~"
A.Forgetting to never hold the breath
B. running out of air
C. runaway low pressure inflator
D. none of the above. . . .

Running out of air DOES NOT "cause" a lung over expansion injury, PADI. NOT BREATHING does. . . .

This question/answer needs to be changed "A" is the CORRECT answer.’

So, given your obvious interest in this issue, and your concerns that the correct answer is apparently not the answer that PADI wants to see: did you contact a) PADI HQ by phone (800-729-7324) or email customerservice@padi.com), or the b) PADI Regional Manager responsible for NC (lucy.dunbar@padi.com), to share your concern?
#559
Subscribed
BenDavid - 5/19/2017 1:46 PM
No Colliam, I didn’t.

Several years ago on the basic OW water exam, I brought it to the instructors attention that another PADI question was incorrect (I forget what it was now, it’s been a decade ago). My instructor agreed the PADI answer was the wrong answer. He told the class if they chose that answer instead of the PADI answer on the exam it wouldn’t be counted wrong. He also said he’d contact PADI thru their PADI PRO channels regarding the error. I also wrote a letter to PADI regarding that question, their incorrect answer, what the correct answer was, and included documentation to support why my answer was the correct answer and the PADI answer was not.

Never heard from them. Not even a rubber-stamp form letter.

It was about then I realized the only thing PADI gives a damn about is making sure you buy the next course.
#33
shaneofhugs - 6/06/2017 11:29 AM
Having taken the exams recently, if this was an old issue, it’s been resolved. The answer is A. Wording is different but the overall message is the same ’breath held ascents = embolism’
#559
Subscribed
BenDavid - 6/06/2017 10:35 PM
The class was recent but might have been old materials they were using for the class. Glad they got it clarified.